Indiana Traminette

The “Indiana Traminette” episode of the IHC podcast is HERE.

June is “Indiana Wine Grape Month,” and the nearly 100 wineries of Indiana are proudly featuring our state’s official signature grape—Traminette. I sat down recently with a couple of experts on Traminette and foods that go with it, on the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast. Thom England is a Certified Executive Chef and Culinary Arts Progam Coordinator at Ivy Tech in Indianapolis. Meredith Easley is with Easley Winery in downtown Indy. Hear what we talked about and tasted HERE.

A hybrid of the German Gewürztraminer and the French Joannes Seyve, Traminette is all-American, having been developed in the 1960’s and 70’s by researchers at the University of Illinois and Cornell University. And it’s gaining in popularity for growers, winemakers, and consumers in the Midwest because of its suitability to our growing conditions and its versatility.

I love Traminette and the variety of styles our Indiana winemakers produce—it can be floral and spicy, crisp and fruity, dry, off-dry, or subtly sweet. Traminette’s versatility makes it a perfect wine to sample and compare as you visit wineries around the state. 

A special congratulations to Butler Winery of Bloomington, winner of Traminette of the IMG_6860Year at the 2019 Indy International Wine Competition held at Purdue University in May. The Butler 2018 Traminette was one of the wines we sampled, along with Easley’s award winning 2016 Traminette, and others from Tonne Winery in Muncie, and Country Heritage Winery, Fort Wayne, Plainfield, and Nashville.

For more information on Indiana wines and wine trails in the state, go to indianawines.org, and indianagrown.org.  

Thanks to Martin Marcelo and Gina Powell of Easley Winery for their help with our tasting–prepping, pouring, and photographing! And thanks to Thom for his delicious food and Meredith for the delightful wines. Cheers!

 

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Uncorking refreshing Traminette
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In the kitchen at Ivy Tech’s Penthouse Restaurant
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Thom’s Indiana pork tenderloins and curry chicken–great partners for Indiana Traminette!
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Cheers, Meredith!

Time for Indiana Wines

For the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast, Time for Indiana Wines, I visited the Horticulture Congress put on by Purdue University recently in Indianapolis. I was specifically interested in the program for Indiana wine makers and grape growers. The Purdue Wine Grape Team organizes the sessions, offering technical instruction as well as marketing and management information for attendees. Listen to the episode HERE

In the episode, I talk with Kris Kane, wine maker and owner of 21 Brix Winery in Portland, New York. He was a guest speaker at the Hort Congress, sharing his story of building a successful winery within a multi-generational diversified farm, like many in Indiana. I also spoke with Indiana wine maker Shane Christ, of Satek Winery in Fremont, Indiana, and Katie Barnett of the Purdue Wine Grape Team. The team is rolling out a year-long marketing push for Traminette wine, made from Indiana’s signature grape. For more details on Traminette and upcoming wine events in the state, visit indianawines.org.

For nearly three decades, the Purdue Wine Grape Team has worked with wine makers and grape growers in the state to develop and grow the industry and improve production methods. In that time, the number of wineries in the state has increased from around ten to one hundred, producing over a million gallons (five million bottles) of wine each year. Acreage of wine grapes is small, but gradually increasing throughout the state. The industry is home-grown and self-supported, getting a boost from the Indiana Wine Grape Council, established by the Indiana General Assembly in 1989. The work of the Council and the Wine Grape Team is funded through a five cent per gallon tax on every gallon of wine sold in the state.

Indiana wineries are everywhere in the state. Check the Indiana Wines website to find wineries near you and seek them out. They are happy to share their knowledge and passion for wine, and offer tastings and special events to spread awareness, understanding, and the fun of Indiana wines.

The wines pictured at the top of this post are from these Indiana wineries (left to right): Huber Winery, Hartland Winery, Satek Winery, Oliver Winery, and Two EE’s Winery.

Your host with Kris Kane, Shane Christ (top), and Katie Barnett.

Small Business Friends

The Saturday after Thanksgiving has become known as “Small Business Saturday,” to remind consumers to shop at local small businesses during the holiday season. I have always liked the idea. Of course, it’s not limited to this one Saturday of the year! Anytime during the holiday season, and the rest of the year, our small local businesses are ready and waiting to provide personal and expert service to one and all.

On the Indiana Home Cooks podcast, I’ve had the pleasure and honor to meet a few of these entrepreneurs around the state. Those involved in food service, craft beer and wine making, retail, and other artisans, namely: Eddie Joe’s Icehouse in West Point, Richelle in a Handbasket in Lafayette, Goods for Cooks in Bloomington, Peoples Brewing Company and Thieme & Wagner Brewing in Lafayette, Honeysuckle Hill Bee-Stro in Brazil, Smittybread in Lafayette, Butler Winery in Bloomington.

Here are a few of those podcast episodes. Click the arrow to listen:

Find all the episodes of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. (Links are also to the right and at the top of this page.) Please subscribe on one of those apps so you don’t miss an episode. And when you subscribe, you can leave a rating or review of the show. I would love to hear what you think about what you hear!

Thank you for giving Indiana Home Cooks a listen, and I look forward to bringing you more stories of the people who cook, eat, and drink in the Hoosier State.

A Look Back–Part One

The Indiana Home Cooks Podcast keeps moving forward with plans for more shows to listen to and posts to read here on the IHC blog. Sharing the stories of people who cook, eat, and drink in the Hoosier State is my mission, and coming soon are shows featuring Indiana food artisans. First, a sound montage from the recent Artisans Marketplace in Indianapolis, and later, a more in-depth conversation with an artisan candy maker in Lafayette. Watch for those episodes coming soon to Apple Podcasts, iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. Simply click the links on the right side of this page, or go to those apps on your phone and search for “Indiana Home Cooks.”

So far nineteen podcast episodes have been produced. I’m highlighting a few of my favorites in this and subsequent posts to give readers and listeners an idea of what the show is all about.  It’s about friends spending time together and sharing a few laughs, memories and recipes…

I hope you give these shows a listen if you haven’t already heard them. Please share them with your friends or family, and give them a rating if you have a moment. That will help others find the show too.

I am deeply grateful for the support of family and friends who have encouraged me to pursue this venture, and have been willing accomplices by letting me interview them on tape! It’s been a blast and I’m looking forward to finding and sharing more stories of cooking, eating, and drinking in the Hoosier State. I hope you will join me.

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The week after Easter, I interviewed Susie Butler, owner of Butler Winery in Bloomington. More on that here.  I couldn’t leave without a bottle, or two, of her wine. I also met Richelle Peterson, owner and operator of Richelle In A Handbasket candy and gift shop in Lafayette, when I walked into her shop and she handed me a piece of chocolate. That’s her English Toffee in the picture below. I’ll interview her soon for the podcast. Another day that week I met a fellow podcaster in Lafayette, Craig Martin, host of Art Tap. Craig is an artist and his podcast explores the vast arts scene in the Lafayette area. Check it out on his blog or on Apple Podcasts and iTunes.

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Butler Winery

Wine production in Indiana has been on the rise for the last few decades, but did you know it has its origins in the early 19th century? Settlers from Switzerland, in the territory that would become the state of Indiana, were the first to successfully grow grapes and make wine commercially in the United States. Wine was being made in many areas of the country, with varying degrees of success, but the Swiss settlers along the Ohio River in Indiana were the first to make a commercial success of it. On the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast, Susie Butler, of Butler Winery told me all about it, and how from those proud hard-scrabble origins, wine making and grape growing finally made a comeback in the 1970’s, several decades after the end of prohibition. It has certainly been an uphill climb.

(Hear the Indiana Home Cooks podcast by clicking the orange button above.)

Those Swiss settlers started out in the southeast of Indiana, in what became Switzerland County, and the town of Vevay. More information on the wineries of that region is here.

To learn more about wine making in Indiana, including its history, check out the “Through The Grapevine” series put together by Purdue’s Wine Grape Team in the College of Agriculture. The Indiana Uplands Wine Trail website has all kinds of information on the wines and wineries, history, and events of this unique viticultural area.

Cheers!