Small Business Friends

The Saturday after Thanksgiving has become known as “Small Business Saturday,” to remind consumers to shop at local small businesses during the holiday season. I have always liked the idea. Of course, it’s not limited to this one Saturday of the year! Anytime during the holiday season, and the rest of the year, our small local businesses are ready and waiting to provide personal and expert service to one and all.

On the Indiana Home Cooks podcast, I’ve had the pleasure and honor to meet a few of these entrepreneurs around the state. Those involved in food service, craft beer and wine making, retail, and other artisans, namely: Eddie Joe’s Icehouse in West Point, Richelle in a Handbasket in Lafayette, Goods for Cooks in Bloomington, Peoples Brewing Company and Thieme & Wagner Brewing in Lafayette, Honeysuckle Hill Bee-Stro in Brazil, Smittybread in Lafayette, Butler Winery in Bloomington.

Here are a few of those podcast episodes. Click the arrow to listen:

Find all the episodes of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. (Links are also to the right and at the top of this page.) Please subscribe on one of those apps so you don’t miss an episode. And when you subscribe, you can leave a rating or review of the show. I would love to hear what you think about what you hear!

Thank you for giving Indiana Home Cooks a listen, and I look forward to bringing you more stories of the people who cook, eat, and drink in the Hoosier State.

A Look Back–Part One

The Indiana Home Cooks Podcast keeps moving forward with plans for more shows to listen to and posts to read here on the IHC blog. Sharing the stories of people who cook, eat, and drink in the Hoosier State is my mission, and coming soon are shows featuring Indiana food artisans. First, a sound montage from the recent Artisans Marketplace in Indianapolis, and later, a more in-depth conversation with an artisan candy maker in Lafayette. Watch for those episodes coming soon to Apple Podcasts, iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. Simply click the links on the right side of this page, or go to those apps on your phone and search for “Indiana Home Cooks.”

So far nineteen podcast episodes have been produced. I’m highlighting a few of my favorites in this and subsequent posts to give readers and listeners an idea of what the show is all about.  It’s about friends spending time together and sharing a few laughs, memories and recipes…

I hope you give these shows a listen if you haven’t already heard them. Please share them with your friends or family, and give them a rating if you have a moment. That will help others find the show too.

I am deeply grateful for the support of family and friends who have encouraged me to pursue this venture, and have been willing accomplices by letting me interview them on tape! It’s been a blast and I’m looking forward to finding and sharing more stories of cooking, eating, and drinking in the Hoosier State. I hope you will join me.

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The week after Easter, I interviewed Susie Butler, owner of Butler Winery in Bloomington. More on that here.  I couldn’t leave without a bottle, or two, of her wine. I also met Richelle Peterson, owner and operator of Richelle In A Handbasket candy and gift shop in Lafayette, when I walked into her shop and she handed me a piece of chocolate. That’s her English Toffee in the picture below. I’ll interview her soon for the podcast. Another day that week I met a fellow podcaster in Lafayette, Craig Martin, host of Art Tap. Craig is an artist and his podcast explores the vast arts scene in the Lafayette area. Check it out on his blog or on Apple Podcasts and iTunes.

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Butler Winery

Wine production in Indiana has been on the rise for the last few decades, but did you know it has its origins in the early 19th century? Settlers from Switzerland, in the territory that would become the state of Indiana, were the first to successfully grow grapes and make wine commercially in the United States. Wine was being made in many areas of the country, with varying degrees of success, but the Swiss settlers along the Ohio River in Indiana were the first to make a commercial success of it. On the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast, Susie Butler, of Butler Winery told me all about it, and how from those proud hard-scrabble origins, wine making and grape growing finally made a comeback in the 1970’s, several decades after the end of prohibition. It has certainly been an uphill climb.

(Hear the Indiana Home Cooks podcast by clicking the orange button above.)

Those Swiss settlers started out in the southeast of Indiana, in what became Switzerland County, and the town of Vevay. More information on the wineries of that region is here.

To learn more about wine making in Indiana, including its history, check out the “Through The Grapevine” series put together by Purdue’s Wine Grape Team in the College of Agriculture. The Indiana Uplands Wine Trail website has all kinds of information on the wines and wineries, history, and events of this unique viticultural area.

Cheers!