Celebrating Family and Fútbol!

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We are staying close to home this summer and enjoying lots of family time. And I hope it reminds our young adult children that home is where the heart is and where you can always get something nourishing and comforting for the stomach and the soul. Part of this summer’s family time is spent celebrating, with food, naturally! Birthdays, graduations, weddings, the World Cup…

In the spirit of the FIFA World Cup Championships, and those 10:00 a.m. matches in the later rounds, breakfast with the World Cup seemed a natural pairing. In the quarterfinal round, it was crepes with ricotta cheese and berry compote filling, as France battled Uruguay. I admit, my dish was not authentically French, but it was authentically “me,” as I used ingredients I had on hand to create something delicious to help us cheer Les Bleus on to victory.

For England v. Sweden, it was scones with our morning coffee, which should tell you who I was backing in that match. And once again, whether my scones are authentically English doesn’t really matter. The difference between a “scone” and what we Americans call a “biscuit” is not vast. In my reading, scones differ from biscuits primarily in the richness of the dough. Scones include eggs and cream in the mix, and biscuits do not. The texture differs as well, with scones being crumbly and biscuits, ideally, flaky.

Scones can feature additions to the dough, such as berries, herbs, chocolate chips, nuts, raisins, etc. For my basic scone, it’s raisins. The recipe, with pictures, is below. I include some explanation of technique, because it is important and might take a bit of practice. For a dough like this “less is more.” The less mixing and handling of the dough, the better. You do not knead this dough. Simply gather it together into a loose ball, and then gently shape it into a rectangle. Many scone recipes instruct you to flatten the ball into a circle, and then cut out pinwheel-wedges. I personally prefer the chunky triangles shown here.

My Best Ever Scones (makes 1 dozen)

  • 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup unsalted butter, chilled
  • 1/2 cup dark raisins
  • 1 egg
  • About 3/4 cup half & half
  • Turbinado (“raw”) sugar

Pre-heat oven to 425º.

Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large mixing bowl. Use a wire whisk to thoroughly mix the dry ingredients. (You want the baking powder, salt, and sugar evenly distributed.) Cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Toss in the raisins and lightly stir. Make a well in the center of the dry mixture and set aside.

In a glass measuring cup, break the egg and beat it with a fork. Add about 3/4 cup of half & half, so your total liquid amount (egg plus cream) equals 1 cup. Mix thoroughly with a fork. 

Pour about 3/4 of the liquid into the well of the dry ingredients. Using a fork, with as few strokes as possible, gently stir until just moistened. The dough will be rough and rather stiff. If it is too dry add a tiny bit more liquid.  Do not over-mix. 

Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Sprinkle dough with a bit of extra flour if it is too sticky to handle. Gently shape dough into a ball, and then gently begin to flatten and elongate into a narrow rectangle, about 2.5 inches by 15.5 inches. It should be about 1.5 inches thick. You do not need a rolling pin, only your hands.

Cut scones in triangle shapes. (A bench scrapper works well, or a straight-bladed knife, cutting straight down. Do not saw! Coat the blade or scrapper with flour if it sticks to dough.) Place scones on a parchment covered baking sheet. Brush tops with remaining liquid. (If you have no remaining liquid, just use more half & half.) Sprinkle with turbinado sugar, and bake in pre-heated 425º oven for 10-12 minutes, until tops and edges have just browned. Cool on a rack and store leftovers in a sealed plastic bag. 

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Mix until just moistened. A few flecks of flour are ok.
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Turn dough onto floured surface, and sprinkle lightly on top with extra flour.
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Shape gently into a ball.
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Gently into a rectangle.
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Cutting scones. (I got a baker’s dozen.)
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Brush with egg/cream and sprinkle with sugar.
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A beautiful bake!