Celebrating Family and Fútbol!

A new episode of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast is coming later this month. In the meantime, please enjoy these favorites that focus on family, in good times, and in difficult times. Subscribe on iTunes/Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. Or listen right here. Just click the play buttons:

We are staying close to home this summer and enjoying lots of family time. And I hope it reminds our young adult children that home is where the heart is and where you can always get something nourishing and comforting for the stomach and the soul. Part of this summer’s family time is spent celebrating, with food, naturally! Birthdays, graduations, weddings, the World Cup…

In the spirit of the FIFA World Cup Championships, and those 10:00 a.m. matches in the later rounds, breakfast with the World Cup seemed a natural pairing. In the quarterfinal round, it was crepes with ricotta cheese and berry compote filling, as France battled Uruguay. I admit, my dish was not authentically French, but it was authentically “me,” as I used ingredients I had on hand to create something delicious to help us cheer Les Bleus on to victory.

For England v. Sweden, it was scones with our morning coffee, which should tell you who I was backing in that match. And once again, whether my scones are authentically English doesn’t really matter. The difference between a “scone” and what we Americans call a “biscuit” is not vast. In my reading, scones differ from biscuits primarily in the richness of the dough. Scones include eggs and cream in the mix, and biscuits do not. The texture differs as well, with scones being crumbly and biscuits, ideally, flaky.

Scones can feature additions to the dough, such as berries, herbs, chocolate chips, nuts, raisins, etc. For my basic scone, it’s raisins. The recipe, with pictures, is below. I include some explanation of technique, because it is important and might take a bit of practice. For a dough like this “less is more.” The less mixing and handling of the dough, the better. You do not knead this dough. Simply gather it together into a loose ball, and then gently shape it into a rectangle. Many scone recipes instruct you to flatten the ball into a circle, and then cut out pinwheel-wedges. I personally prefer the chunky triangles shown here.

My Best Ever Scones (makes 1 dozen)

  • 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup unsalted butter, chilled
  • 1/2 cup dark raisins
  • 1 egg
  • About 3/4 cup half & half
  • Turbinado (“raw”) sugar

Pre-heat oven to 425º.

Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large mixing bowl. Use a wire whisk to thoroughly mix the dry ingredients. (You want the baking powder, salt, and sugar evenly distributed.) Cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Toss in the raisins and lightly stir. Make a well in the center of the dry mixture and set aside.

In a glass measuring cup, break the egg and beat it with a fork. Add about 3/4 cup of half & half, so your total liquid amount (egg plus cream) equals 1 cup. Mix thoroughly with a fork. 

Pour about 3/4 of the liquid into the well of the dry ingredients. Using a fork, with as few strokes as possible, gently stir until just moistened. The dough will be rough and rather stiff. If it is too dry add a tiny bit more liquid.  Do not over-mix. 

Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Sprinkle dough with a bit of extra flour if it is too sticky to handle. Gently shape dough into a ball, and then gently begin to flatten and elongate into a narrow rectangle, about 2.5 inches by 15.5 inches. It should be about 1.5 inches thick. You do not need a rolling pin, only your hands.

Cut scones in triangle shapes. (A bench scrapper works well, or a straight-bladed knife, cutting straight down. Do not saw! Coat the blade or scrapper with flour if it sticks to dough.) Place scones on a parchment covered baking sheet. Brush tops with remaining liquid. (If you have no remaining liquid, just use more half & half.) Sprinkle with turbinado sugar, and bake in pre-heated 425º oven for 10-12 minutes, until tops and edges have just browned. Cool on a rack and store leftovers in a sealed plastic bag. 

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Mix until just moistened. A few flecks of flour are ok.
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Turn dough onto floured surface, and sprinkle lightly on top with extra flour.
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Shape gently into a ball.
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Gently into a rectangle.
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Cutting scones. (I got a baker’s dozen.)
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Brush with egg/cream and sprinkle with sugar.
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A beautiful bake!

Homemade Salad Dressing–You can do it!

There is one item you will almost never find in my refrigerator–bottled salad dressing. Okay, some bottled dressings are fine, but most of what I’ve tasted are over the top. Too salty, too much seasoning, too heavy, too thick, too sweet…just too much. But I refuse to dwell on the negative. I will rather focus on the positive and the multitude of ways we can think beyond the bottle.

(NOTE: The Indiana Home Cooks Podcast is taking a short hiatus. I’ll be back with a new episode in July. In the meantime, catch up on your listening! There are over 20 episodes available. Listen on iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. In the spirit of stretching your cooking boundaries, here are a few suggestions. Thanks for listening!)

A good salad dressing will delight your taste buds, not overpower them. It shouldn’t be too vinegary or oily, and with seasonings that complement rather than mask the ingredients of the salad. So my approach is to keep it simple. On any given night when I’m assembling a salad of ordinary garden vegetables and greens, I’ll whisk up a simple oil and vinegar dressing, a “vinaigrette,” before serving. A pinch of salt and pepper and a small dollop of dijon mustard are whisked together with the vinegar. Then the oil is drizzled slowly in while continuing to whisk until everything is blended. It takes about two minutes.

That is the basis for any vinaigrette. It is complete in and of itself, or it can be augmented with herbs and seasonings of your choice.  The vinegar can be white, red, rice, balsamic, or any other flavor you have in the cupboard. Instead of vinegar, use the juice of a lemon, lime, or orange, or the last of that bottle of wine you did not finish the night before. Any of these acids will do. The oil can be olive, canola, vegetable, sunflower, grape seed, or flavor-infused. And seasonings can include fresh or dried herbs, soy sauce, garlic, chili sauce, you name it. I also add a bit of sweetener–honey or sugar–to balance the acid a bit.

The type of salad you are making often determines the type of dressing needed. For a Greek-style salad of tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, olives, feta cheese, and lettuce (or no lettuce), the basic vinaigrette gets a boost from oregano–either fresh or dried. A simple salad of tomatoes, onion, and fresh mozzarella needs a simple treatment of balsamic vinegar, olive oil, salt, pepper, and fresh basil. To make it even easier, just drizzle and sprinkle each ingredient over the vegetables, and gently toss together. Voilà! You just made fresh dressing. (Another option is Asian-style dressing. See recipe below.)

Most basic cookbooks include vinaigrettes to make from scratch, and a quick read of them will give you the ratio of vinegar to oil. In several cookbooks I’ve checked, the “standard” is one part vinegar to three parts oil (1:3).  But that is not set in stone. Some recipes are 1:2, others, 1:1. Depending on what’s in your salad, the flavor profile you are going for, and your own tastes, the proportion can be adjusted accordingly. Experiment and taste as you go. That’s the way to find what YOU like and what works best for you.

(Online sources for vinaigrette basics: thekitchn, allrecipes, Food Network’s Ina Garten.)

A great idea is to mix up a large batch of the basic vinaigrette, say two cups worth, and keep it in the refrigerator in a jar with a screw-top lid. To make a dressing for tonight’s meal, shake up the vinaigrette, pour off what you need, add herbs or seasonings as desired and mix. You can also pour off a portion to use as a marinade, adding whatever herbs and seasonings you want.

This is what I love about making my own salad dressings. There are so many options with ingredients and flavor combinations, using what we have on hand right now in the cupboard or fridge! It doesn’t take much time at all, and it is a basic skill that helps the home cook learn about flavors and how they work together to make a dish something special.

Still, there are times when nothing but ranch dressing will do. Hot wings, anyone? And as a parent it’s hard to dispute the value of Hidden Valley–the gateway to your kids eating their veggies.

Susan’s Asian-Style Salad Dressing

  • 1/4 C rice vinegar
  • A pinch of kosher salt and fresh ground pepper
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1/2 tsp minced fresh ginger
  • 1/2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 C canola oil

In a small mixing bowl or a 2-cup glass measuring cup, whisk together all ingredients except the canola oil. When thoroughly combined, slowly pour in the canola oil while whisking. 

Alternatively, place all ingredients in a glass jar, tightly screw on the lid and shake to thoroughly combine. Refrigerate until ready to use. Will keep up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Shake or whisk again just before adding to salad. Makes enough dressing for 3-4 servings, or a dinner-sized salad for two.

This dressing goes well with a salad that combines romaine lettuce, savoy cabbage (very thinly sliced), sliced scallions, peeled and sliced oranges or mandarin orange segments, toasted sliced almonds, sesame seeds, in any combination. Toss the lettuce and cabbage with the dressing, then top with the other ingredients.

You can add sliced grilled chicken to the party and make this salad a complete meal. Enjoy!

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My Asian-Styled Salad with (leftover) grilled chicken
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Some of my favorite sources for “the basics”

Friends & Neighbors

Catching up with old friends is a delightfully grounding experience. Many years may have passed, but the reminiscing brings you all right back to the same spot in time. For me, that spot is Carbon, Indiana, in northern Clay County, and our little community of friends and neighbors.

The Egloff “clan” all lived within a three-mile radius of my family’s home. The brothers Earl, Ernie, and Ralph (aka Pat), were there my whole life, and their sister Lucille moved almost next door a bit later. There was always something interesting going on with the Egloffs and their spouses and kids. Family cookouts and fishing at the Egloff pond, card parties, church activities, delicious food, and so on.

The oldest brother, Earl, was my grandfather’s best friend and fishing buddy. It was fun just listening to those two talk. It was fun listening to any of the Egloffs talk. Some were droll, some boisterous, but it was always interesting, whatever they had to say, and how they said it. The voice is so much a part of the person. Inflection, dialect, feeling, tone, it all helps define our perception of a person’s identity.

In the latest Indiana Home Cooks podcast episode, I’m joined by two of the Egloff clan. Mary Egloff, wife of Ernie, and Pat Egloff, who is also known as Ralph. (We explain the two identities in the episode!) They graciously shared memories of their younger days, and our common bonds as family friends. Sadly, both Ernie and Pat’s wife Joan are no longer with us. I recently heard an old Irish blessing that struck a chord. “Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, but love leaves a memory no one can steal.” That is abundantly apparent talking with Mary and Pat. They have memories aplenty, and I am blessed to have shared in a few of them.

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Richelle In A Handbasket

There is a place on the alley in Lafayette’s Market Square where an attitude of gratitude is pervasive. When you walk in the door you are greeted with warm hospitality, smiles, and even hugs. Oh, and then there’s the chocolate…and the “Addiction”…and so many other candies and snacks and gift merchandise. And it’s all from Indiana. Well, at least ninety-nine percent of it is, and 100 percent from small businesses. It’s a shop called Richelle In A Handbasket, and the idea is to help people up their game in showing gratitude. On the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast, I visit Richelle In A Handbasket. You can hear it right here:

Richelle Peterson moved from a corporate career to entrepreneur, because of a call to help people do a better job of showing gratitude. A gift card or a box of summer sausage, cheese, and crackers don’t cut it for Richelle. And in the area of corporate gift giving–to clients and employees at holiday time–she saw a huge opportunity. I’ve always said, “Never look a gift horse in the mouth,” but I, and probably most of us, have been on the receiving end of a gift that wasn’t particularly thoughtful. Enter, Richelle Peterson, to the rescue!

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And she does give the impression of riding in to save the day. (Check the podcast–above–to hear why Wonder Woman is so important to her!) We’ve all heard the old phrase “going to hell in a hand basket,” describing a situation going badly. Richelle has faced difficult circumstances, and turned the idea of “going to hell in a hand basket” on its head. The baskets that leave her shop are filled with love and care, hugs and smiles. Her goal is that the recipient feels all those things when they receive one of her baskets. And when they taste the truffles, the toffee, the Addiction snack mix, they taste the quality and care that go into every bite.

The story of Richelle and her shop is the story of Indiana Home Cooks. It’s about understanding the importance of putting your heart and soul into what you do. For me it’s about cooking a meal as an act of love. For Richelle it’s about the thought, care, concern, and love that go into the foods and into the baskets that leave her store to bring smiles and blessings to the recipients. It’s not about what we are eating, it’s about the shared experience, the tradition, the goodness, the love and care that come with the eating.

Richelle is not a fan of the Heath Bar candy bar, as you can hear in the podcast. Her English toffee puts a Heath Bar to shame. Still, I have a recipe for Heath Bar Cake that I’ve made all my life. Maybe I’ll bake one and bring her a slice. And I’ll share the recipe here, another day!

Learn more at richelleinahandbasket.com, and on Facebook.

Desperation

If you cook, you know what it is. From “What’s for dinner?”  to “I didn’t realize I was out of eggs…”  to “I need to come up with a dessert for the party tonight!”  It takes many forms, desperation, and it sometimes calls for desperate measures. I uncovered a recipe recently that answers that call–“Crazy Chocolate Cake.”

(I prepare this recipe on the May 4 edition of Earth Eats, a program of WFIU, Public Radio from Indiana University. You can find Earth Eats at this link.)

When I say “uncovered,” I truly mean it.  I was looking for some quick thing to bake to go along with the fresh strawberries I had bought one day. Flipping through the “C’s” in my recipe file, my eye landed on this one, which I had written out longhand with no attribution, date, or anything to indicate I had ever baked it. No smudges, drips, stains, notations, or corrections. That day I couldn’t be bothered even to stir up batter for shortcake to go with my strawberries, so I decided this untested, but very simple, crazy cake would be just the thing.

It’s the simple formula and procedure that make this Crazy Chocolate Cake appealing. I did an online search to find other versions, and most of them mirrored my own recipe. I was drawn to the origins of Crazy Chocolate Cake and learned this type of cake, lacking milk, eggs, or butter, comes from the “desperation” category of recipes. During desperate times such as the Great Depression or the World Wars, some ingredients were in short supply or expensive to purchase. (My economist husband would remind me those two circumstances go hand in hand.) Home cooks had to improvise or use alternative ingredients for things lacking in the larder. This cake was often called War Cake, Depression Cake, or Wacky Cake, to fit the times.

Pie recipes were often altered to fit the ingredients on hand. Our own “official state pie,” the beloved Sugar Cream Pie, certainly falls into that category. You could say we’ve moved from desperation to convenience when it comes to the Sugar Cream Pie, as Wick’s Pies offers the definitive version, ready-made, in the freezer section at your local grocery! (We’ll talk more about that in a future Indiana Home Cooks Podcast episode.)

But a desperate situation can also come about because the home cook is simply out of one of the ingredients called for, or lacking time to create an elaborate dish or dessert. That’s where I was as I sought a quick and easy recipe for a baked accompaniment  to fresh strawberries. The Crazy Chocolate Cake contains no milk, eggs, or butter, requires no electric mixing, and no mixing bowl! All ingredients are stirred together in the baking pan. When the cake is cooled, it may be frosted, but I prefer a simpler approach–a light dusting of powdered sugar. That’s all this rich, moist cake needs.

Occasionally in the coming months, you can hear recipes from Indiana Home Cooks on Earth Eats, a program on WFIU, Public Radio from Indiana University. It airs on WFIU-2 (101.9 FM) Fridays at 7:30 p.m., and on WFIU-1 (103.7 FM), Saturdays at 7:30 a.m. Earth Eats is also a podcast, where you can listen on demand, whenever you want.

Susan’s Crazy Chocolate Cake

Pre-heat oven to 375º

Measure directly into a 13” x 9” cake pan, un-greased and un-floured:

  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 6 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda

Mix these dry ingredients thoroughly in the pan, using a fork or wire whisk. Make three wells in the dry ingredients (two small and one large well). Assemble the following ingredients:

  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 2 tsp vinegar
  • Scant 2/3 cup canola or other light oil
  • 2 cups cold water

Into one of the small wells put vanilla, and into the other small well put vinegar. Finally, pour the oil into the larger well. Carefully pour the 2 cups water over all. With a fork or whisk, stir thoroughly, making sure to incorporate all dry ingredients and the oil. Take it slowly at first, so as not to slosh anything out of the pan. The batter will have small lumps. That’s unavoidable mixing by hand, and it’s fine.

Bake at 375º for 30 minutes. A toothpick inserted in center should come out clean when done. Cool completely on a rack. 

To serve, dust individual cake pieces with powdered sugar. Delicious with fresh strawberries, whipped cream, or crème fraiche. 

Indiana Artisans

Indiana Artisan is a non-profit organization whose mission is to identify and showcase the state’s highest quality art and food. The Indiana Artisan Marketplace was held recently at the State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis, and I spoke with several of the artisans for the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast. Listen here:

The Indiana Artisan program was established through a resolution the state General Assembly passed in 2010. Since then the organization has approved, through a juried process, about 200 artists and food makers across the state to carry the “Indiana Artisan” brand. Two retail shops in the state are now devoted to selling Indiana Artisan products–one at the French Lick Resort, and a new location in downtown Carmel. The full story of the Indiana Artisan program is at it’s website.

While the bulk of the participants in the Indiana Artisan program are artists, there are many food makers among the group. These are folks who have taken a family recipe and turned it into a commercial success, or others who are highly skilled and have a passion for candy making, bread baking, wine making, etc. As one of the entrepreneurs told me, Indiana Artisan is not an organization you can pay ten dollars to join. Artisans submit an application and samples of their work, and are adjudicated by expert panels as to their worthiness in meeting the standards of the program. This rigorous application and jury process takes place only once each year, and only about twenty percent of applicants make the grade.

Of those who have succeeded, I spoke with five at the Indiana Artisan Marketplace, held in early April at the State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis. That’s the subject of the latest Indiana Home Cooks podcast (press the orange play button above to hear it). Here is a rundown of who you will hear on the podcast, and links to their own websites:

David VanWye, Amazing Hazel’s Gourmet Chili Sauce.

Jay Noel, owner of Abbott’s Candies, based in Hagerstown.

Nick Murdick, creator and owner of Presto Kombucha fermented teas.

Connie Molenaar, of Connie’s Creations Long Leaf Pine Needle Baskets.

Dan Adams, owner and winemaker, Winzerwald Winery in Perry County.

All the above vendors are on Facebook and/or other social media. Look them up and let them know you heard about them on the Indiana Home Cooks podcast!

Goods For Cooks

It’s a comfort knowing that some things will always be there when we need them. Be it family, a friend, a house, a vacation spot, your hometown, a favorite food lovingly prepared for you. Life can take us in many directions and many miles from where we started, but when we come home we feel comfort in the familiar.

Those who cook and eat in Bloomington, Indiana, have a place like that–Goods For Cooks, the shop on the square that has supplied cooking and kitchen wares for over four decades. A handful of owners have minded the store, each giving it their own personal touch during their tenure. The newest owner, Sam Eibling, took over last fall and is busy putting her own stamp on Goods.

On the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast (LISTEN at the link above, or on Apple Podcasts, iTunes, or Stitcher), I visited Goods For Cooks and talked with Sam about this new venture that she and her brother as co-owner have embarked upon. While Sam is excited to update and add new products to the assortment at Goods For Cooks, she is also committed to maintaining the familiar selection and the reliable service Goods has always been known for. She considers her ownership of the store as stewardship–maintaining and strengthening a Bloomington institution to thrive for decades to come.

Learn more about Goods For Cooks at goodsforcooks.com. They’re also on Facebook and Instagram. The store is located on the square in downtown Bloomington, 115 North College Avenue.