Richelle In A Handbasket

There is a place on the alley in Lafayette’s Market Square where an attitude of gratitude is pervasive. When you walk in the door you are greeted with warm hospitality, smiles, and even hugs. Oh, and then there’s the chocolate…and the “Addiction”…and so many other candies and snacks and gift merchandise. And it’s all from Indiana. Well, at least ninety-nine percent of it is, and 100 percent from small businesses. It’s a shop called Richelle In A Handbasket, and the idea is to help people up their game in showing gratitude. On the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast, I visit Richelle In A Handbasket. You can hear it right here:

Richelle Peterson moved from a corporate career to entrepreneur, because of a call to help people do a better job of showing gratitude. A gift card or a box of summer sausage, cheese, and crackers don’t cut it for Richelle. And in the area of corporate gift giving–to clients and employees at holiday time–she saw a huge opportunity. I’ve always said, “Never look a gift horse in the mouth,” but I, and probably most of us, have been on the receiving end of a gift that wasn’t particularly thoughtful. Enter, Richelle Peterson, to the rescue!

IMG_5030

And she does give the impression of riding in to save the day. (Check the podcast–above–to hear why Wonder Woman is so important to her!) We’ve all heard the old phrase “going to hell in a hand basket,” describing a situation going badly. Richelle has faced difficult circumstances, and turned the idea of “going to hell in a hand basket” on its head. The baskets that leave her shop are filled with love and care, hugs and smiles. Her goal is that the recipient feels all those things when they receive one of her baskets. And when they taste the truffles, the toffee, the Addiction snack mix, they taste the quality and care that go into every bite.

The story of Richelle and her shop is the story of Indiana Home Cooks. It’s about understanding the importance of putting your heart and soul into what you do. For me it’s about cooking a meal as an act of love. For Richelle it’s about the thought, care, concern, and love that go into the foods and into the baskets that leave her store to bring smiles and blessings to the recipients. It’s not about what we are eating, it’s about the shared experience, the tradition, the goodness, the love and care that come with the eating.

Richelle is not a fan of the Heath Bar candy bar, as you can hear in the podcast. Her English toffee puts a Heath Bar to shame. Still, I have a recipe for Heath Bar Cake that I’ve made all my life. Maybe I’ll bake one and bring her a slice. And I’ll share the recipe here, another day!

Learn more at richelleinahandbasket.com, and on Facebook.

Indiana Artisans

Indiana Artisan is a non-profit organization whose mission is to identify and showcase the state’s highest quality art and food. The Indiana Artisan Marketplace was held recently at the State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis, and I spoke with several of the artisans for the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast. Listen here:

The Indiana Artisan program was established through a resolution the state General Assembly passed in 2010. Since then the organization has approved, through a juried process, about 200 artists and food makers across the state to carry the “Indiana Artisan” brand. Two retail shops in the state are now devoted to selling Indiana Artisan products–one at the French Lick Resort, and a new location in downtown Carmel. The full story of the Indiana Artisan program is at it’s website.

While the bulk of the participants in the Indiana Artisan program are artists, there are many food makers among the group. These are folks who have taken a family recipe and turned it into a commercial success, or others who are highly skilled and have a passion for candy making, bread baking, wine making, etc. As one of the entrepreneurs told me, Indiana Artisan is not an organization you can pay ten dollars to join. Artisans submit an application and samples of their work, and are adjudicated by expert panels as to their worthiness in meeting the standards of the program. This rigorous application and jury process takes place only once each year, and only about twenty percent of applicants make the grade.

Of those who have succeeded, I spoke with five at the Indiana Artisan Marketplace, held in early April at the State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis. That’s the subject of the latest Indiana Home Cooks podcast (press the orange play button above to hear it). Here is a rundown of who you will hear on the podcast, and links to their own websites:

David VanWye, Amazing Hazel’s Gourmet Chili Sauce.

Jay Noel, owner of Abbott’s Candies, based in Hagerstown.

Nick Murdick, creator and owner of Presto Kombucha fermented teas.

Connie Molenaar, of Connie’s Creations Long Leaf Pine Needle Baskets.

Dan Adams, owner and winemaker, Winzerwald Winery in Perry County.

All the above vendors are on Facebook and/or other social media. Look them up and let them know you heard about them on the Indiana Home Cooks podcast!