Trip to the Sunflower State

Part of our busy summer included a road trip with my daughter Christine to Manhattan, Kansas, a place near and dear to our hearts. Our family started out in Manhattan, where my husband Jim and I met and where we raised our family until 2009, when we moved back to my home state of Indiana.

Manhattan (pop. 53,000) is in northeast Kansas, about 2 hours west of Kansas City. During our years there we made many trips across Kansas, Missouri, and Illinois on I-70. I had not been back to the Sunflower State since we moved nine years ago. Christine had flown back the summer she turned 16, but this was our first road trip back to “The Little Apple.”

The city has grown substantially since we left, but we were delighted to find Manhattan retains its friendly, welcoming, down-to-earth vibe, plus some fun places for food, drink, and shopping. It’s also the home of Kansas State University, and our family maintains a special fondness for the K-State Wildcats. Manhattan is worth a stop for anyone traveling across the Sunflower State.

One friend I caught up with in Manhattan is Sharon Davis. She is my guest on the latest Indiana Home Cooks podcast. (Listen here, or click the “play” button above.) Sharon is program director for the Home Baking Association, an organization that promotes and helps build skills in home baking for all ages. She and I go back to the days when our kids were students in the Manhattan Catholic Schools, and before that when I was still a radio professional, covering Kansas agriculture and Sharon was doing educational programming with HBA and the wheat and soybean groups in the state.

I’m so happy I could get together with Sharon. I should say, I’m happy her schedule permitted it! She is one busy lady, so I’m fortunate that during my couple of days in Manhattan she was able to work me into her schedule. We’ll hear more from Sharon in the next episode of Indiana Home Cooks. She will share some recipe ideas and thoughts on favorite things to bake. Watch for that soon. In the meantime, enjoy this episode with Sharon and me.

Resources mentioned by Sharon:  The Family Dinner Project, SNAP-Ed, the HBA Blog.

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Sharon Davis doing what she loves.
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Me, doing what I love. Lunch and a beer at the Tall Grass Brewing Tap House, overlooking downtown Manhattan, KS.

Celebrating Family and Fútbol!

A new episode of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast is coming in September. In the meantime, please enjoy these favorites that focus on family, in good times, and in difficult times. Subscribe on iTunes/Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. Or listen right here. Just click the play buttons:

We are staying close to home this summer and enjoying lots of family time. And I hope it reminds our young adult children that home is where the heart is and where you can always get something nourishing and comforting for the stomach and the soul. Part of this summer’s family time is spent celebrating, with food, naturally! Birthdays, graduations, weddings, the World Cup…

In the spirit of the FIFA World Cup Championships, and those 10:00 a.m. matches in the later rounds, breakfast with the World Cup seemed a natural pairing. In the quarterfinal round, it was crepes with ricotta cheese and berry compote filling, as France battled Uruguay. I admit, my dish was not authentically French, but it was authentically “me,” as I used ingredients I had on hand to create something delicious to help us cheer Les Bleus on to victory.

For England v. Sweden, it was scones with our morning coffee, which should tell you who I was backing in that match. And once again, whether my scones are authentically English doesn’t really matter. The difference between a “scone” and what we Americans call a “biscuit” is not vast. In my reading, scones differ from biscuits primarily in the richness of the dough. Scones include eggs and cream in the mix, and biscuits do not. The texture differs as well, with scones being crumbly and biscuits, ideally, flaky.

Scones can feature additions to the dough, such as berries, herbs, chocolate chips, nuts, raisins, etc. For my basic scone, it’s raisins. The recipe, with pictures, is below. I include some explanation of technique, because it is important and might take a bit of practice. For a dough like this “less is more.” The less mixing and handling of the dough, the better. You do not knead this dough. Simply gather it together into a loose ball, and then gently shape it into a rectangle. Many scone recipes instruct you to flatten the ball into a circle, and then cut out pinwheel-wedges. I personally prefer the chunky triangles shown here.

My Best Ever Scones (makes 1 dozen)

  • 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup unsalted butter, chilled
  • 1/2 cup dark raisins
  • 1 egg
  • About 3/4 cup half & half
  • Turbinado (“raw”) sugar

Pre-heat oven to 425º.

Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large mixing bowl. Use a wire whisk to thoroughly mix the dry ingredients. (You want the baking powder, salt, and sugar evenly distributed.) Cut in the butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Toss in the raisins and lightly stir. Make a well in the center of the dry mixture and set aside.

In a glass measuring cup, break the egg and beat it with a fork. Add about 3/4 cup of half & half, so your total liquid amount (egg plus cream) equals 1 cup. Mix thoroughly with a fork. 

Pour about 3/4 of the liquid into the well of the dry ingredients. Using a fork, with as few strokes as possible, gently stir until just moistened. The dough will be rough and rather stiff. If it is too dry add a tiny bit more liquid.  Do not over-mix. 

Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Sprinkle dough with a bit of extra flour if it is too sticky to handle. Gently shape dough into a ball, and then gently begin to flatten and elongate into a narrow rectangle, about 2.5 inches by 15.5 inches. It should be about 1.5 inches thick. You do not need a rolling pin, only your hands.

Cut scones in triangle shapes. (A bench scrapper works well, or a straight-bladed knife, cutting straight down. Do not saw! Coat the blade or scrapper with flour if it sticks to dough.) Place scones on a parchment covered baking sheet. Brush tops with remaining liquid. (If you have no remaining liquid, just use more half & half.) Sprinkle with turbinado sugar, and bake in pre-heated 425º oven for 10-12 minutes, until tops and edges have just browned. Cool on a rack and store leftovers in a sealed plastic bag. 

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Mix until just moistened. A few flecks of flour are ok.
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Turn dough onto floured surface, and sprinkle lightly on top with extra flour.
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Shape gently into a ball.
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Gently into a rectangle.
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Cutting scones. (I got a baker’s dozen.)
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Brush with egg/cream and sprinkle with sugar.
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A beautiful bake!

Friends & Neighbors

Catching up with old friends is a delightfully grounding experience. Many years may have passed, but the reminiscing brings you all right back to the same spot in time. For me, that spot is Carbon, Indiana, in northern Clay County, and our little community of friends and neighbors.

The Egloff “clan” all lived within a three-mile radius of my family’s home. The brothers Earl, Ernie, and Ralph (aka Pat), were there my whole life, and their sister Lucille moved almost next door a bit later. There was always something interesting going on with the Egloffs and their spouses and kids. Family cookouts and fishing at the Egloff pond, card parties, church activities, delicious food, and so on.

The oldest brother, Earl, was my grandfather’s best friend and fishing buddy. It was fun just listening to those two talk. It was fun listening to any of the Egloffs talk. Some were droll, some boisterous, but it was always interesting, whatever they had to say, and how they said it. The voice is so much a part of the person. Inflection, dialect, feeling, tone, it all helps define our perception of a person’s identity.

In the latest Indiana Home Cooks podcast episode, I’m joined by two of the Egloff clan. Mary Egloff, wife of Ernie, and Pat Egloff, who is also known as Ralph. (We explain the two identities in the episode!) They graciously shared memories of their younger days, and our common bonds as family friends. Sadly, both Ernie and Pat’s wife Joan are no longer with us. I recently heard an old Irish blessing that struck a chord. “Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, but love leaves a memory no one can steal.” That is abundantly apparent talking with Mary and Pat. They have memories aplenty, and I am blessed to have shared in a few of them.

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A Look Back–Part One

The Indiana Home Cooks Podcast keeps moving forward with plans for more shows to listen to and posts to read here on the IHC blog. Sharing the stories of people who cook, eat, and drink in the Hoosier State is my mission, and coming soon are shows featuring Indiana food artisans. First, a sound montage from the recent Artisans Marketplace in Indianapolis, and later, a more in-depth conversation with an artisan candy maker in Lafayette. Watch for those episodes coming soon to Apple Podcasts, iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. Simply click the links on the right side of this page, or go to those apps on your phone and search for “Indiana Home Cooks.”

So far nineteen podcast episodes have been produced. I’m highlighting a few of my favorites in this and subsequent posts to give readers and listeners an idea of what the show is all about.  It’s about friends spending time together and sharing a few laughs, memories and recipes…

I hope you give these shows a listen if you haven’t already heard them. Please share them with your friends or family, and give them a rating if you have a moment. That will help others find the show too.

I am deeply grateful for the support of family and friends who have encouraged me to pursue this venture, and have been willing accomplices by letting me interview them on tape! It’s been a blast and I’m looking forward to finding and sharing more stories of cooking, eating, and drinking in the Hoosier State. I hope you will join me.

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The week after Easter, I interviewed Susie Butler, owner of Butler Winery in Bloomington. More on that here.  I couldn’t leave without a bottle, or two, of her wine. I also met Richelle Peterson, owner and operator of Richelle In A Handbasket candy and gift shop in Lafayette, when I walked into her shop and she handed me a piece of chocolate. That’s her English Toffee in the picture below. I’ll interview her soon for the podcast. Another day that week I met a fellow podcaster in Lafayette, Craig Martin, host of Art Tap. Craig is an artist and his podcast explores the vast arts scene in the Lafayette area. Check it out on his blog or on Apple Podcasts and iTunes.

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700 going on 1,000

Since launching the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast five months ago, I’ve had over 700 “listens,” and I thank each and every one of you for taking some time to check out my little show. Seeing it surpass the 700 mark, I’ve been wondering, how soon till we reach 1,000? So I’m putting together a push to reach 1,000 “listens” for the podcast.

If you’ve not tuned in yet, it’s very simple. Click here for Apple Podcasts, or here for Stitcher, whichever podcast player you prefer. There you will see the complete list of shows and you can listen to them all, or just the ones that interest you. If you subscribe to the podcast, you’ll get the latest episodes as they are posted. Right now that’s about every 10 days, give or take. There is no cost to subscribe.

If you like what you hear, share it with your friends, on your Facebook page, or on other social media. This blog has sharing buttons at the bottom of each post. Feel free to share it  with someone who might like Indiana Home Cooks.

Finally, if you have suggestions or ideas for future shows, let me know. You can reply on my Facebook page, Twitter, or send me an email: susanmintert@gmail.com.

Thank you again for your support of Indiana Home Cooks. I hope to hear from you with your feedback, and I’ll keep looking for new stories of food and drink in the Hoosier State to share with you.

Welcome to Indiana Home Cooks

Hello friends of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast. Susan Mintert here, creator and host of the podcast, and author of this blog. This is where you can find more information on what you hear on Indiana Home Cooks. If we talk about recipes, or demonstrate a dish on the show, you can look for it here. I’ll also have additional insights, pictures, and other background right here for specific shows.

So how did I get started on this podcast venture, anyway? The short answer is I have a background in radio (most of it in public radio) and a great interest in food and love of cooking. I enjoy talking to people who do the real work of putting food and drink on the table, all the way from the grower, to the processor, to the home cook or professional, to the person sitting down and eating or drinking it. I guess that’s the very definition of “farm to fork,” or “farm to glass” in the case of beer and wine.

Oh, and I should mention the other part of it. I am a Hoosier, in both senses of the word. I was born and raised on a farm in Clay County, and am a graduate of Indiana University. So the formative years were spent in Clay County and Bloomington, and now I’m based in West Lafayette. Yes, that West Lafayette, home of the Purdue Boilermakers. A crucial twenty years was spent in Kansas, but more about that later. For now, suffice to say I do have divided loyalties and am okay with that!

But back to the podcast….I hope you will enjoy hearing stories of family traditions, Hoosier customs, food and history, craft beer brewing, wine making, bread baking….in short, how food is more than what feeds our bodies. On Indiana Home Cooks we explore how food feeds the soul and how preparing a meal or a dish to share with others is an act of love.

We talk to food entrepreneurs who have turned a passion into a business. And we visit festivals that focus on food and drink, and events and sites that honor Indiana history and culture through food.

We also have fun and a few laughs along the way, especially when we get in the kitchen and create dishes right before your very ears! We’re cooking, baking, and “dishing” with a Hoosier sensibility. Check it out on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. And let me know what you think.

Memories of Home

The first Indiana Home Cooks podcast of 2018 features reminiscences of my mom, Barbara Mercer. She sat down with me some months ago to record the first interview for a podcast venture that was still in the “concept” phase. In the intervening months I couldn’t find a good spot for it on the podcast. But with the winter winds blowing, snow falling, and the thermometer making its home in the single digits above and below zero, I thought it was the perfect time for the warm comforts of home.

In the episode, Memories of Home, Mom reminisces about “butchering day” on the farm when she was a young girl in Clay County. As I listened to her descriptions, I couldn’t help thinking about the “Little House” books by Laura Ingalls Wilder.  These were some of my very favorite books when I was a girl, and the charming illustrations by Garth Williams brought them even more to life than the vivid prose. I pulled out my copy of Little House in the Big Woods, and sure enough, in chapter one, there it was–Wilder’s account of butchering day when she was a little girl. And not much had changed from 1870’s frontier Wisconsin to mid-20th century Indiana when it came to butchering a hog.

In a wrap up of the holidays, this episode also includes the step-by-step preparation of our Fluffy Yeast Rolls. These rolls have been a staple of family dinners all my life. Special occasions, mind you, not everyday meals. It’s not that the rolls are difficult or time consuming, but they do require a little advance planning, and they are pretty rich for everyday consumption. We make them at least once a year, at Thanksgiving, and sometimes at Christmas or Easter. The recipe (with photos) is included below.

Katy Eberle and I discussed bread baking also, since I was on a little bread baking jag. I brought her a baguette I had made the day before. One of my favorite homemade bread recipes is Crusty Italian Bread from the King Arthur Flour Baker’s Companion. Here is the recipe from my King Arthur book…

If you prefer a copy without spilled coffee stains, notes, and other jottings, check it out online here.

Fluffy Yeast Rolls
From the kitchen of Barbara Mercer, from Margaret Balder
Makes 18 rolls

Dissolve 1 pkg. active dry yeast in 3 T. lukewarm water in a small bowl or measuring cup. While that is dissolving, whisk together the following ingredients in a large mixing bowl:

1/2 C. (one stick) unsalted butter or margarine, melted
1 tsp. salt
1 C. lukewarm water
1/4 C. sugar
2 eggs, room temperature

Add yeast mixture and whisk again. To this mixture, add 3 C. all-purpose flour. Mix with electric mixer until fairly smooth. Stir in 1 C. flour by hand. (Total of 4 cups of flour) Dough will be sticky. DO NOT KNEAD. Leave dough in bowl, cover with a plate or plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

Three hours before baking:
Remove dough from refrigerator. It should’ve doubled overnight. Grease muffin pans for 18 rolls. Melt 1/4 C. butter.

Punch down dough and pull off pieces of dough roughly the size of large walnuts and shape into balls (2 dough balls for each roll). Dip each ball into melted butter before placing in pan. Cover rolls with tea towels and let rise until double. Bake in preheated 450 degree oven for 5-10 minutes, until golden brown.* After baking, while still hot and in the pans, brush tops with more melted butter. Serve warm.

*If using dark baking pans, reduce oven temp to 425 degrees.