Where to Hear “Indiana Home Cooks”

I’d like to take a few minutes to update my readers and listeners on where you can tune in and listen to the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast. I am in the process of making some adjustments to my podcast feed and doing more promotion to grow awareness and listenership of the show.

The new audio home (my podcast hosting site) is now Podbean.  You can listen there from your computer or on the Podbean app for mobile devices. If you listen on Podbean, it would help me in the quest for more listeners if you would click the “Follow” button right below the IHC picture logo on the Podbean site or app.

Perhaps the easiest way to hear Indiana Home Cooks episodes is to simply subscribe to the podcast on iTunes/Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music. Virtually every computer, smartphone and smart device has one of those apps already installed. You can click the links I’ve provided in this paragraph and go right to the Indiana Home Cooks podcast page, or you can type “Indiana Home Cooks” into the search bar when you open either iTunes/Apple Podcasts or Google Play Music, and you’ll go straight to the page that way. When you get there, please click “Subscribe.” It’s free to subscribe, you’ll not miss an episode, and it will help me build awareness of the show.

The IHC podcast is available on other apps as well, like Spotify and Stitcher, so if you listen to podcasts elsewhere, look for Indiana Home Cooks and subscribe.

No matter where you listen, please SHARE the podcast with your friends and family. Just click the “Share” button wherever you happen to listen. And please “follow” and “share” this blog.  It’s the place for added information and stories from the show, plus recipes and pictures.

A programming note for listeners and readers in the Bloomington, Indiana, area–I’m sharing some of my cooking demos with “Earth Eats,” a program featuring news and recipes inspired by local food and sustainable agriculture, on Indiana Public Radio WFIU. Earth Eats airs on WFUI2, 101.9FM, Friday evenings at 7:30, and on WFIU, 103.7FM, Saturday mornings at 7:30. Earth Eats is also a podcast from Indiana Public Media, so you can listen even if you are outside WFIU’s coverage area. My demos appear occasionally on Earth Eats, including one this weekend. Let me know if you hear it!

Finally, you can follow and “friend” Indiana Home Cooks on Instagram and Facebook. Between podcast episodes and blogposts, I stay in touch through social media, sharing  what I’m cooking or baking and seeing what others are up to as well. Leave a comment or direct message on either Insta or FB, or contact me with the “Contact” link here on the blog. I hope to hear from you soon!

Cincinnati-Style Chili

The Evolution of a Recipe

Over the recent holidays I took the opportunity to trot out an old family favorite recipe.  My “Cincinnati-Style Chili” is great when the kids are home or when friends are over, as it makes a large batch that will feed a crowd. And it offers the opportunity to work with spices you might not think of using in chili. My kitchen demo explaining the steps can be heard below, in this BONUS TRACK of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast.  

At some point in my younger days, my family became acquainted with a fast food eatery called Skyline Chili.  It was started in Cincinnati by a Greek immigrant who opened his dining establishment within site of the downtown Cincy skyline.  He served authentic Greek dishes, and his chili was a big hit with customers. Today dozens of Skyline Chili restaurants dot the states of Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and beyond.  With a unique seasoning blend, added toppings of beans, onions, shredded cheese (chili three-way), all nestled in a bed of spaghetti, what’s not to love?  (Hoosiers know Steak N Shake has its own version of this dish as well.)

Not long after getting our first taste of Skyline Chili, my mom happened upon a recipe for “Cincinnati Chili.”  She made it and we judged it as good as Skyline’s.  It became one of our family’s favorite wintertime meals.  

Many years later, newly married and contemplating the eternal question “What’s for dinner?” I remembered the Cincinnati Chili recipe and thought how good that sounded, and I knew my husband would love it.  I called my mom and asked her to read the recipe to me over the phone.  What I transcribed is shown below.  “June 15—Stacy” referred to  the upcoming wedding date of my cousin, which my mom had recently learned and informed me of on the same phone call. Our recipe files sometimes contain vital information that has nothing to do with food.

Now this recipe transcription may leave you scratching your head. I failed to record the second ingredient correctly, and it took several attempts to determine that it is indeed tomato sauce, and not paste. Too bad I didn’t use a pencil. And I didn’t even write the title of the recipe at the top until several years later. The sheet was always folded and filed under “C,” and when I came to the recipe headed with “June 15–Stacy,” I knew I’d found Cincinnati Chili. 

Rather than forcing you to decipher my quirky recipe notations, I’ll share what I hope are clearer instructions below. They have evolved over the years. Give it a try this winter for a hearty, family-pleasing dinner. And hear the demo HERE.

Subscribe to the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast wherever you get your podcasts–iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, etc. Links are to your right and at the top of this page.

Cincinnati Style Chili

Makes 8-10 servings

  • 2 lb. ground beef
  • 2 cups chopped onion
  • 2 T canola or vegetable oil
  • 2 T chili powder
  • 1tsp dried chipotle powder
  • 1 tsp dried ancho chili powder
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/4 tsp ground cloves
  • 1/2 tsp granulated garlic
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 T vinegar, any kind
  • 1 T Worchestershire sauce
  • 3 cups water, divided
  • 1 15-oz can tomato sauce
  • 1/2 oz unsweetened chocolate
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 tsp dried chili pepper, if more heat is desired

For serving, you will need:

  • Cooked spaghetti
  • 1 or 2 14-oz cans red beans or chili beans, rinsed and drained
  • Shredded cheese (Colby, Colby-jack, pepper jack, cheddar, any of those)
  • Diced sweet (raw) onion, optional

Measure all dry spices and set aside.

In a large pot or dutch oven, brown ground beef, then remove from pot, drain, and set aside. Into pot (med to med-low heat), drizzle oil, then add chopped onions. Sauté for about a minute, then put in all the pre-measured dried spices. Stir them into the onions and cook another minute. You should begin to smell the fragrance of the spices.  Return the ground beef to the pot, then add garlic, salt, vinegar, Worchestershire sauce and one cup water. Turn up heat to med or med-high, and allow mixture to come up to a boil. Stir and scrape up any bits that are stuck on the bottom of the pot. Add the tomato sauce, chocolate, bay leaf and 2 more cups of water. (Go ahead and add the dried chili powder if desired, or add later if you feel chili needs more heat. Or serve it at the table and let everyone decide for themselves!) Also, you can add the beans right to the pot at this point, or reserve and heat them up later to serve with the chili.

The chili at this point is very watery. That’s ok, it will cook down. Allow pot to come back up to boil, then turn down heat to low and let it simmer 2-3 hours, with the lid on, but slightly vented. Stir occasionally making sure chili is not sticking or burning on the bottom. If it cooks down and seems too thick, add more water. 

Serve over cooked spaghetti, topped with beans (if serving separately), cheese, and onions if desired.

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Measure spices and seasonings ahead of time.
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Chili has cooked down and thickened nicely.
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What else can I say about this artifact…

 

 

Celebrating Holiday Foods

My final podcast of the year is a conversation with my daughter, Christine Hack. She’s a young bride working on the balance of marriage, work, home, and everything else life throws our way. She has many personal interests and cooking and baking are among them. She often sends me pictures of her kitchen triumphs.

During the Christmas holiday season, Christine and I sat down to talk over some of our favorite holiday foods, traditions, and memories. Hear our conversation HERE.

We cover the gamut from the popularity of oyster dressing at Thanksgiving, to fruitcake (paying homage to Christine’s high school freshman English teacher, the late Shari Schap), to Christmas cookies, and the origin story of our family’s French Market Donuts.

Pour yourself a hot beverage, a glass of wine, or a “wee dram,” and join us at the kitchen table while we chat. I’m sharing recipes for French Market Donuts and Cranberry Noels for you to try over the holidays. Enjoy. And here’s to abundant holiday blessings and a happy new year to all. Cheers!

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French Market Donuts (Beignets)

Yields about 7 dozen small square donuts (Note: I make a half recipe to feed a family of four on Christmas morning.)

  • 1 cup hot water
  • 1/4 cup shortening
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup evaporated milk
  • 1 package active dry yeast, dissolved in 1/2 cup lukewarm water
  • 2 eggs, room temperature
  • About 7 cups all purpose flour

Put shortening in large mixing bowl and pour hot water over shortening. Add sugar, salt, and milk. Give it a gentle stir. When mixture becomes lukewarm, add the yeast dissolved in water, eggs, and 4 cups flour. Beat well with electric mixer. Add the remainder of flour, knead a few times just to get the dough cohesive and smooth. Put dough in a large bowl or plastic container (lightly oiled) and place in the refrigerator over night. 

When ready to fry, heat at least 4” of oil in a deep pot on the stove or deep fryer, to 350-375º. Have powdered sugar in a sifter or in a large zip-top bag standing by. Cut off chunks of dough and roll them out on a lightly floured surface. Roll thin (about 1/8”) and cut into squares. A pizza cutter works best. Carefully drop dough pieces into hot oil. They fry very quickly so watch them. When golden brown on both sides, remove to drain on paper towel lined baking sheet. When drained, put hot donuts on serving plate and sift a generous amount of powdered sugar over all. Or, put powdered sugar in a zip-top bag, drop in donuts and lightly shake to coat. Serve hot.

Note: When fried, this dough puffs up to make an airy, yet chewy donut. The dough will keep several days in the fridge, so you can have more than one morning of fresh hot donuts!

 

Cranberry Noels

Makes about 4 dozen

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 T milk
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp of orange zest
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans*
  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut

Beat butter and sugar with electric mixer on medium speed until light and fluffy. Add milk, vanilla, salt, and orange zest. Beat until just combined. Gradually add flour, cranberries, and pecans. Mix on low speed until fully combined. 

Divide dough in half. Shape each half into 8-inch logs, about 2 inches diameter. Roll each log in coconut and then wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate until firm, at least 2 hours. 

When ready to bake, pre-heat oven to 375º. Using a sharp straight knife (not serrated), cut cold logs into 1/4-inch thick slices. Place on baking sheet about 2 inches apart. Bake 10-12 minutes, or until edges are golden. Transfer cookies to rack to cool.

*Toasting brings out the nutty flavor of pecans. Toast them whole ahead of time on a baking sheet or pan, at 350º for 8-10 minutes. I put them in a cold oven and let them begin toasting as the oven heats up. Check after 8 minutes. They’ll darken just a bit and become fragrant. Don’t over-bake. Allow to cool then chop fine for this recipe. (Tip: toast a whole bag of pecan halves at once and you’ll have a ready supply for baking, salads, etc.)

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Cranberry Noels and Christmas Cut-out Sugar Cookies

Caramel Corn in a Paper Bag

In this BONUS TRACK of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast, my daughter, Christine, and I make a quick and easy sweet treat that will have everyone standing in the kitchen crunching and munching the moment it’s done. It’s my Caramel Corn cooked in a paper bag. Hear it HERE

My mom made this recipe many times when we were growing up. But I had not tried it in ages. When I ran across it in my recipe file a few years ago around Christmas time, I decided I would give it a try on Christmas Day. Something fun to do while celebrating the holiday.

I remembered the caramel corn tasting good when my mom made it, but I had forgotten how addictive it can be! It is very hard to stop eating it once you start. That’s why I hurry and package as much of it as I can to give as gifts. It’s perfect to pass out to neighbors, co-workers, or as stocking stuffers.

Give it a try while the kids are home on winter break. Or if you need a snack to take to a party. It will be time well spent. Very little time, at that.

Caramel Corn in a Paper Bag  

  • 8 quarts of popped popcorn (unseasoned)
  • 1 C. brown sugar
  • ½ C. butter
  • ¼ C. light corn syrup
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. baking soda (measure and set aside)
  • One paper grocery bag 

Note:   All microwave cooking instructions are for HIGH POWER, 1100 watts.

Put popped popcorn in paper grocery bag and set aside.

Have 2-3 large baking pans ready to cool caramel corn.

Combine brown sugar, butter, corn syrup, and salt in a microwave-safe bowl.  (1 to 2 quart capacity)  Note:  caramel mixture will expand and bubble during cooking so make sure your cooking vessel is large enough. Set aside the baking soda. 

Microwave caramel ingredients together for 2 minutes.  Stir mixture, and then microwave for 2 more minutes.  Add baking soda and stir.  Mixture will become foamy.  

Pour caramel mixture over popcorn in paper bag.  Fold closed and shake bag to distribute caramel.  Keep bag closed at all times during cooking and shaking. Place bag in microwave oven. If your microwave does not have a turntable, pause a few times during cooking to move bag around.

  • Microwave for 1.5 minutes, then shake bag.  
  • Microwave for 1 minute, shake bag.
  • Microwave for 45 seconds, shake.
  • Microwave for 30 seconds, shake.

When done, open bag carefully away from your face. Pour caramel corn out onto cookie sheets to cool.  

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The first stir.
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After cooking the caramel, baking soda is added.
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The soda causes caramel to foam. It’s ready to pour over popcorn.
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It’s all in the bag. Shake to thoroughly mix.
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It’s a close fit in the microwave.
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This bag has done its duty.
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Ready to pour out and cool.

The Chef on the Farm

The Lafayette Journal & Courier of Sunday, December 2, 2018, features a front page story on Lauren Reed, events coordinator and chef at The Farm at Prophetstown State Park, near Battle Ground, Indiana. Several months ago, she was featured in Lafayette Magazine. But even before that, Lauren Reed was my guest on the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast. Hear it by clicking the “play” arrow above. Or listen on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. The title of the episode is “The Farm at Prophetstown.” Lauren not only creates farm-to-table cuisine at The Farm, but she also cooks for the VIP tailgates for the Indianapolis Colts and at the Super Bowl! There is more on Lauren and The Farm on the Indiana Home Cooks blog right here.

If you haven’t done so, please subscribe to the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, etc., and you can be notified when a new episode is available. Find the podcast by typing “Indiana Home Cooks” into the search bar. You can stream episodes or download them to your smart phone or tablet for listening later. The great thing about downloading is you can listen off-line without using any of your mobile data. And it’s the perfect way to take your podcasts with you and listen while traveling.

Coming this week on the podcast–my visit with an Indiana master brewer who has turned his passion for home-brewed craft beer into a successful career in manufacturing equipment for home brewers world-wide.

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Chef Lauren Reed lighting the antique cooking stove at The Farm.

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BONUS Track–Fluffy Yeast Rolls for Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving! I hope you are well prepared for the holiday feast, whether you are  hosting the meal, bringing a dish to someone else’s home, traveling many miles to celebrate with family, or keeping it low key with a small group. I’m putting up a BONUS TRACK of the Indiana Home Cooks podcast with a cooking demo featuring my mom, Barbara Mercer. She and I teamed up last Thanksgiving and stirred together our family’s traditional Fluffy Yeast Rolls. Have a listen to find out just how easily the dough comes together–no kneading required! And the recipe is below. Happy baking, and here’s wishing you and yours abundant Thanksgiving blessings.

Stay in touch here on the website, or on Instagram and Facebook. Be sure to subscribe to the Indiana Home Cooks podcast at iTunes or Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, or Spotify.

See more pictures and information on the Fluffy Yeast Roll recipe here.

Fluffy Yeast Rolls
From the kitchen of Barbara Mercer, from Margaret Balder
Makes 18 rolls

Dissolve 1 pkg. active dry yeast in 3 T. lukewarm water in a small bowl or measuring cup. While that is dissolving, whisk together the following ingredients in a large mixing bowl:

1/2 C. (one stick) unsalted butter or margarine, melted
1 tsp. salt
1 C. lukewarm water
1/4 C. sugar
2 eggs, room temperature

Add yeast mixture and whisk again. To this mixture, add 3 C. all-purpose flour. Mix with electric mixer until fairly smooth. Stir in 1 C. flour by hand. (Total of 4 cups of flour) Dough will be sticky. DO NOT KNEAD. Leave dough in bowl, cover with a plate or plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

Three hours before baking:
Remove dough from refrigerator. It should’ve doubled overnight. Grease muffin pans for 18 rolls. Melt 1/4 C. butter.

Punch down dough and pull off pieces of dough roughly the size of large walnuts and shape into balls (2 dough balls for each roll). Dip each ball into melted butter before placing in pan. Cover rolls with tea towels and let rise until double. Bake in preheated 450 degree oven for 5-10 minutes, until golden brown.* After baking, while still hot and in the pans, brush tops with more melted butter. Serve warm.

*If using dark baking pans, reduce oven temp to 425 degrees.

 

Eddie Joe’s Icehouse

If your idea of barbecue is some form of shredded pork swimming in a thick syrupy sauce ladled onto a bun, then I’d like to suggest you make your way to West Point, Indiana. That’s the home of Eddie Joe’s Icehouse, where barbecue means SMOKING MEAT–beef brisket, pork butt, ribs, chicken, sausage, etc.  On the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast, I visit Eddie Joe’s and talk to owner Lee Stanish about barbecue–from his early days with his first smoker, which he built from scratch, to how he grew that hobby into a thriving business. Click the “play” button above to hear it.

Learn more about Eddie Joe’s Icehouse here.

Enjoy this little departure from all the Thanksgiving talk on all the food channels, websites, and podcasts. With Thanksgiving in mind however, I took a cue from Lee and made my first attempt at smoking a whole turkey breast on my Big Green Egg smoker. It turned out quite well. My second turkey smoke with be this weekend in preparation of the big day on November 22. I heard someone say “Practice doesn’t make perfect. Practice makes better.” I’m always trying to get better at smoking meat, and building my relationship with the Big Green Egg. We are still in the “dating” phase, as Lee explains in the podcast.

I’ll post my progress on Instagram @indianahomecooks, so keep an eye on that. Please follow me there and on Facebook. I would love to hear from you. Happy Thanksgiving!

Note: If you have signed up to receive my blog posts in your email inbox (thanks for doing that), you may not get a version that includes the handy “play” button allowing you listen to the podcast. That is unfortunate, but not difficult to remedy. Simply click the title of the blog article you are reading in your inbox and you will go straight to the blog and have easy access to listen to the podcast. And keep in mind, you can always subscribe to the Indiana Home Cooks podcast on iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. That goes for everyone–not just email subscribers! Thanks and cheers!!

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Lee Stanish at the Eddie Joe’s bar.
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The smoker, where the magic happens.
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The woodpile.
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Eddie Joe’s Icehouse, downtown West Point, IN.