Paleo and Not So Paleo

 

My daughter Christine and I traveled to Manhattan, Kansas, in May to visit friends and our old stomping grounds. (Read more about it in my previous post here.)  On the new podcast episode, we are in the Manhattan kitchen of Karin Matta cooking up an indulgent cauliflower crust pizza.

Also in the new episode we hear more from Sharon Davis of the Home Baking Association. During our chat she mentions the King Arthur Flower website as a superb resource for home bakers. I agree. I have done a lot of sourdough baking recently and have used many tips and recipes from KAF.

See pictures of some of my sourdough baking and other dishes @indianahomecooks on Instagram.

Scroll down for pictures from our Kansas excursion

Karin’s Cauliflower Crust PizzaIMG_5174

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cooked, riced cauliflower
  • 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • ½ tsp crushed garlic
  • ½ tsp garlic salt
  • Pizza sauce
  • Shredded cheese (for topping)
  • Your choice of additional toppings (olives, meat, grilled onions, mushrooms, etc) – note that toppings need to be precooked (they will be reheated when you complete the broiling process below).

Directions:

To “rice” the Cauliflower:

Take 1 large head of fresh cauliflower, remove stems and leaves, and chop the florets into chunks.  Add to food processor and pulse until it looks like grain.  Do not over-do pulse or you will puree it.  (If you don’t have a food processor, you can grate the whole head with a cheese greater).  Place the riced cauliflower into a microwave safe bowl and microwave for 8 minutes (some microwaves are more powerful than others, so you may need to reduce this cooking time).  There is no need to add water, as the natural moisture in the cauliflower is enough to cook itself. – I suggest 4 minutes if only doing 1 cup.  I generally shred the entire cauliflower and make a larger pizza (i.e. doubling all ingredients) or multiple pizzas crusts at one time and freeze extra pizza crusts for future use. 

One large head should produce approximately 3 cups of riced cauliflower.  The remainder can be used to make additional pizza crusts immediately, or can be stored in the refrigerator for up to one week.  We also use riced cauliflower as “rice” by heating it with butter and adding ground meat (or chicken) and additional vegetables for a “stir fry” type meal.

To Make the Pizza Crust: IMG_5172

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.  Spray a cookie sheet with non-stick cooking spray.  I use pizza stones and do not add any cooking spray or oils.   Do NOT put the crust on tin foil as it is very difficult to separate it.

In a medium bowl, stir together 1 cup cauliflower, egg and mozzarella.  Add oregano, crushed garlic and garlic salt; stir.  Transfer to the cookie sheet, and using your hands, pat out into a 9” round.  Optional:  Brush olive oil over top of mixture to help with browning.

Bake at 450 degrees for 15 minutes (start with less time).

Remove from oven.  To the crust, add sauce, toppings and cheese.  Place under a broiler at high heat just until cheese is melted (approximately 3-4 minutes).

Enjoy!  (Karin’s notes in italics. Adapted from Your Lighter Side.)

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Here’s that shredder. Awesome!

 

Susan’s Crazy Chocolate Cake–The recipe is here.

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Highlights from our Kansas excursion…..

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Spoons, anyone? Pryde’s in Westport, Kansas City, MO.
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Karin, me, Christine, & Tori at Radina’s Bakehouse.
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Radina’s has the right attitude.
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Karin’s flat top grill. How cool is that?
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The Flint Hills tallgrass prairie in northeast Kansas.

One summer circle came to a close when Karin and Tori visited West Lafayette at the end of June for the wedding of our daughter Christine and Logan Hack. Christine, born and raised in Kansas, is happy to express her Sunflower State heritage.

Version 2

Richelle In A Handbasket

There is a place on the alley in Lafayette’s Market Square where an attitude of gratitude is pervasive. When you walk in the door you are greeted with warm hospitality, smiles, and even hugs. Oh, and then there’s the chocolate…and the “Addiction”…and so many other candies and snacks and gift merchandise. And it’s all from Indiana. Well, at least ninety-nine percent of it is, and 100 percent from small businesses. It’s a shop called Richelle In A Handbasket, and the idea is to help people up their game in showing gratitude. On the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast, I visit Richelle In A Handbasket. You can hear it right here:

Richelle Peterson moved from a corporate career to entrepreneur, because of a call to help people do a better job of showing gratitude. A gift card or a box of summer sausage, cheese, and crackers don’t cut it for Richelle. And in the area of corporate gift giving–to clients and employees at holiday time–she saw a huge opportunity. I’ve always said, “Never look a gift horse in the mouth,” but I, and probably most of us, have been on the receiving end of a gift that wasn’t particularly thoughtful. Enter, Richelle Peterson, to the rescue!

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And she does give the impression of riding in to save the day. (Check the podcast–above–to hear why Wonder Woman is so important to her!) We’ve all heard the old phrase “going to hell in a hand basket,” describing a situation going badly. Richelle has faced difficult circumstances, and turned the idea of “going to hell in a hand basket” on its head. The baskets that leave her shop are filled with love and care, hugs and smiles. Her goal is that the recipient feels all those things when they receive one of her baskets. And when they taste the truffles, the toffee, the Addiction snack mix, they taste the quality and care that go into every bite.

The story of Richelle and her shop is the story of Indiana Home Cooks. It’s about understanding the importance of putting your heart and soul into what you do. For me it’s about cooking a meal as an act of love. For Richelle it’s about the thought, care, concern, and love that go into the foods and into the baskets that leave her store to bring smiles and blessings to the recipients. It’s not about what we are eating, it’s about the shared experience, the tradition, the goodness, the love and care that come with the eating.

Richelle is not a fan of the Heath Bar candy bar, as you can hear in the podcast. Her English toffee puts a Heath Bar to shame. Still, I have a recipe for Heath Bar Cake that I’ve made all my life. Maybe I’ll bake one and bring her a slice. And I’ll share the recipe here, another day!

Learn more at richelleinahandbasket.com, and on Facebook.