Summer Happenings

I’m gathering material for a couple of upcoming episodes of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast, and I hope you’ll check them out when they are posted. I have some other tasks to complete in the next week, and after that I’ll be in the studio editing and producing like mad to get them ready. I’m working on episodes featuring Professor Torbert’s Orange Corn Grits, based in West Lafayette, and Shoup’s Country Foods in Frankfort.

Shoup’s Country Foods sponsor the Backyard BBQ Cook-Off at the Indiana State Fair each year. The fair is coming up soon, August 2-18, and the cook-off is Saturday, August 10. Catagories include pork ribs, pork loin, chicken, “Build a Hog Burger,” and more. If you are a backyard barbecuer, consider entering! You’ll find all the details HERE. The deadline to enter is July 26, or until space fills up.

(I just found out I’ll be a judge for the BBQ Cook-Off! So sign up or come by and see it all take place August 10 at the Indiana State Fair.)

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The Shoup family of Frankfort, Indiana, started in the custom meat processing business decades ago. Over the years they have expanded into a retail meat store, mail order, and catering business. Catering has lead them to open their own event center and to involvement with the biggest catered tailgate party anywhere–the Super Bowl. Their story will be featured on an upcoming episode of the IHC Podcast.

On my blog and on social media you may have seen pictures of Professor Torbert’s Orange Corn Grits. I’ve cooked them several times and liked the results so much I couldn’t help sharing! I met Professor Torbert Rocheford and his son Evan recently and I’ll be sharing their story about how the grits came to be, and where in the world orange corn comes from. (Hint: Professor Torbert invented it.)

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Italian Pot Roast with Professor Torbert’s Orange Corn Grits

 

Look for these stories and more here on the blog and on the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast. You can always catch up on your listening by clicking on the episodes listed here on the blog. Or go to indianahomecooks.podbean.com, Apple Podcasts/iTunes, Stitcher, Google, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Subscribe, download, and take IHC on your summer travels. That’s a great time to listen. And thanks!

Indiana Farmers Coliseum photo from Wikipedia.

 

Vegetable Tian–BONUS TRACK

Hear this Bonus Track of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast HERE.

All our Indiana crops are suffering from late planting, soggy, if not out-right flooded soils, and cool temperatures so far this spring and summer. We will see the effects throughout the season in farm fields, in the garden, and at the farmers markets. Lower than normal yields and a decrease in quality are no doubt in store this summer and fall.

For those who like to cook with the seasons, it might be “slim pickin’s” of fresh local produce this summer, but we’ll manage and make do with the choices available. If the quality of produces is not picture perfect, I have a suggestion. Try a vegetable tian. It’s pronounced “tee ANN” or “tee OHN,” depending on how French you want to sound. I tend to fall somewhere in the middle–“tee AHN.” However you say it, it’s a delicious and easy way to prepare summer vegetables in a flavorful, colorful side dish.

There are many versions of tian, but it’s all the same idea. Google it and you’ll find recipes from Ina Garten, Martha Stewart, and about every chef out there. In my version, it starts on the stove in a cast iron skillet, then we move out to the grill for most of the cooking. I usually cook this dish on the gas grill, but live fire will work also, as long as you can monitor and regulate your cooking temp. With a small amount of seasoning, this combination comes out bursting with flavor and freshness.

Vegetable Tian On The Grill

  • Olive oil
  • Kosher salt & fresh ground pepper (plus thyme or oregano, if desired)
  • One large yellow sweet onion, sliced in 1/4-inch thick slices
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 4-5 Yukon Gold or red skin potatoes, depending on size, sliced 1/4-in thick
  • 2-3 ripe tomatoes, sliced 1/4-in thick
  • 2-3 small zucchini, sliced 1/4-in thick
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese

On the stove, heat a 10-inch cast iron skillet, or other pan suitable for the grill, to medium low. Get the outdoor grill preheated to 375º. Drizzle in the skillet about 2 T olive oil, then put in onion slices and begin to cook, no higher than medium low. You are not cooking them completely, just getting them started. After a couple minutes, add the garlic, stir, and continue cooking gently for another minute. Then remove from heat and turn off stove. Season the onions and garlic with just a pinch of salt and pepper, and add another drizzle of olive oil.

To the skillet, on top of the onions, add the potatoes, tomatoes, and zucchini in layers. Either potato/tomato/zucchini, in a fan arrangement, or a potato layer, followed by tomato layer, followed by zucchini layer. Whatever makes you happy. Season lightly as you add layers. Top with the parmesan cheese and another generous drizzle of olive oil.

Using oven mitts (it may still be hot from the stove) take the skillet out to the preheated grill (375º). Place it on the grill over direct heat. After 10-15 minutes, move to indirect heat and finish cooking, about 30 more minutes. At that point, cover the pan with aluminum foil and continue cooking 15 more minutes, for a total cooking time of 60 minutes on the grill.  Test potatoes for doneness before removing from grill.

When done, set the skillet aside while you finish preparing the rest of the meal. The tian can sit for up to 30 minutes before serving. It’s also good served at room temperature. Serve it right out of the skillet.

If you don’t want to cook the tian on the grill, simply bake in a 375º oven following the same instructions.

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Onions & garlic just start to soften.
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Tomatoes, zucchini, potatoes (I didn’t use all 5 potatoes!)
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1/4-inch sliced
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Onto the grill
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End of cooking, golden brown

Sandy Beach BBQ

Hear the Sandy Beach BBQ episode HERE.

The arrival of grilling season always inspires new ideas for outdoor cooking, whether on a gas or charcoal grill, or in a smoker. Since purchasing a Big Green Egg combination grill/smoker a couple years ago, I’ve been working on my BBQ game, improving in consistency, but also identifying what I still don’t understand. And if you are like me, and most backyard barbecuers, you might only fire up your smoker on the weekend, so you don’t get the repetition needed to really master a cooking technique. It does help to take notes, so you can remember what worked or didn’t work the last time!

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Michelle & Andy Schwindler

I started following the Sandy Beach Barbecue Company on Instagram over a year ago and was impressed with the images of their food cooked on the Big Green Egg. They have a lot of fun doing demonstrations at their Big Green Egg dealership on the shore of Lake Freeman just south of Monticello, Indiana. As the weather slowly, and laboriously, warmed up this spring, I decided to call Michelle and Andy Schwindler, owners of Sandy Beach, and ask if they would show me their set up and be my guest on the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast. They enthusiastically agreed!

When I arrived, Andy had two of the Eggs fired up, one filled with chicken and cauliflower roasting in the smoky heat, and the other in preparation for an appetizer of melted brie, blueberries, and pecans. Was I in for a treat! Andy and Michelle could not have been kinder and more hospitable with their time, knowledge, and food.

See the pictures from my visit below and see more from the Sandy Beach Barbecue Company on Instagram and Facebook and at their website. They have a full slate of live fire dinners featuring low and slow BBQ, wood-fired pizza, surf & turf, and other options.

Full disclosure: I did not purchase my Big Green Egg from Sandy Beach. But I wish I had, as you will hear at the end of the podcast. Happy grilling, smoking, and BBQ’ing!

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On the new Indiana Home Cooks podcast episode, we talk about all the food shown here and how it was cooked. Top to bottom: Andy at the Egg; whole chicken, drumstick lollipops, & cauliflower steaks; breaking down the chicken; melted brie with blueberries and pecans; lunch!

Indiana Food Artisans-2019

The new show is HERE.

Defining our state’s culture is the at the core of the Indiana Artisans. Since 2008, this non-profit program has been identifying the best of the best craftspeople and food makers in the state, and helping them market their products and build a brand that signifies “the best” of Indiana.

The annual Indiana Artisan Marketplace, held in early spring at the State Fairgrounds in Indianapolis, is one showcase for these artisans. The new episode of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast features three of the food artisans at this year’s Marketplace: Lathay Pegues, founder of JohnTom’s BBQ Sauce, based in Muncie; Sister Jean Marie Ballard of the Sisters of St. Benedict in Ferdinand; and Angie Burton, of Burton’s Maplewood Farms in Medora.

Each of these artisans has a unique story about how they turned a traditional recipe into something they can share with folks in the Hoosier State and beyond. From a grandfather’s barbecue sauce, to baked goods with German roots, to a new spin on Indiana maple syrup, these are a small sample of the variety of foods and food stories that come from our Hoosier Heartland.

Look for Indiana grown and produced foods in your local grocery and other small retailers, and at farmers markets, local fairs and festivals. You might be surprised at the variety but certainly not at the quality of products available.

Here are the links to the artisans featured in this episode:

JohnToms BBQ Sauce

Sisters of St. Benedict Monastery Baked Goods

Burton’s Maplewood Farm Barrel Aged Maple Syrup

Indiana Artisan Program

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Lathay Pegues,JohnTom’s BBQ Sauce
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Angie Burton, Burton’s Maplewood Farms
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Sister Jean Marie Ballard, Sisters of St. Benedict

Eddie Joe’s Icehouse

If your idea of barbecue is some form of shredded pork swimming in a thick syrupy sauce ladled onto a bun, then I’d like to suggest you make your way to West Point, Indiana. That’s the home of Eddie Joe’s Icehouse, where barbecue means SMOKING MEAT–beef brisket, pork butt, ribs, chicken, sausage, etc.  On the latest episode of the Indiana Home Cooks Podcast, I visit Eddie Joe’s and talk to owner Lee Stanish about barbecue–from his early days with his first smoker, which he built from scratch, to how he grew that hobby into a thriving business. Click the “play” button above to hear it.

Learn more about Eddie Joe’s Icehouse here.

Enjoy this little departure from all the Thanksgiving talk on all the food channels, websites, and podcasts. With Thanksgiving in mind however, I took a cue from Lee and made my first attempt at smoking a whole turkey breast on my Big Green Egg smoker. It turned out quite well. My second turkey smoke with be this weekend in preparation of the big day on November 22. I heard someone say “Practice doesn’t make perfect. Practice makes better.” I’m always trying to get better at smoking meat, and building my relationship with the Big Green Egg. We are still in the “dating” phase, as Lee explains in the podcast.

I’ll post my progress on Instagram @indianahomecooks, so keep an eye on that. Please follow me there and on Facebook. I would love to hear from you. Happy Thanksgiving!

Note: If you have signed up to receive my blog posts in your email inbox (thanks for doing that), you may not get a version that includes the handy “play” button allowing you listen to the podcast. That is unfortunate, but not difficult to remedy. Simply click the title of the blog article you are reading in your inbox and you will go straight to the blog and have easy access to listen to the podcast. And keep in mind, you can always subscribe to the Indiana Home Cooks podcast on iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you like to listen to podcasts. That goes for everyone–not just email subscribers! Thanks and cheers!!

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Lee Stanish at the Eddie Joe’s bar.
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The smoker, where the magic happens.
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The woodpile.
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Eddie Joe’s Icehouse, downtown West Point, IN.